RESAAS to power Asian Real Estate Association of America’s social network

14,000-member trade group will start rolling out RESAAS platform in January

A trade group focused on boosting Asian-American homeownership has signed a deal with a real estate technology company to offer the group’s members their own social network.

As part of an agreement, Vancouver-based RESAAS Services Inc., which also refers to itself as “The Real Estate Social Network,” will provide the 14,000-member Asian Real Estate Association of America (AREAA) with an exclusive AREAA social network on the RESAAS platform.

Social connections image via Shutterstock.
Social connections image via Shutterstock.

The network will allow AREAA members to better receive internal communications and share knowledge with each other in real time, not just with other AREAA members but with other real estate professionals on RESAAS. AREAA members will also be able to develop their own page of social content and market it across various social networks.

“Delivering a social networking platform with RESAAS unites our growing membership and fosters communication about all of our events and initiatives in North America, and abroad internationally,” said Ivan Choi, 2014 AREAA national chair, in a statement.

AREAA’s members, spread out across 32 chapters in the U.S. and Canada, include real estate, mortgage, government and housing-related professionals who serve the Asian-American market.

RESAAS will first roll out its platform to AREAA’s Young Professionals Network, theEDGE, in January, and then nationwide to all AREAA members in February, said RESAAS President Tom Rossiter.

The company has been signing up clients left and right this year, with seven brokerages under its belt so far this month. Last month, RESAAS produced a “mockumentary” meant to coax old-school agents into adopting the latest technology and social media tools.

In August, AREAA signed an agreement with the Chicago-based Realtor University Center for Real Estate Studies to study how Asian immigrants use their homes and businesses to leverage and grow wealth and to develop a greater understanding of housing market preferences among Asian immigrant groups.


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