Marketing

Be clear, not clever, in your real estate Facebook ads

Create an ad that gets the right people clicking

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There are a lot of elements that go into setting up a real estate Facebook ad that will produce an astonishing return on investment. You have to target your audience, set your budget, use the right picture and write the ad! This can be a lot of work, and each element can make or break your ad.

Most companies have a person that they hire specifically for each one of these tasks. If you’re like most other Realtors, that’s not in your budget. So instead of skipping lunch for the next month to afford a professional copywriter, study these tips to help your Facebook ads and posts generate some clicks.

1. Be clear, not clever.

Facebook is cluttered! You see pictures of friends’ vacations, their kids, random quizzes, “Candy Crush” invites, messages from all the groups you’re in … Did I forget anything?

Translation? Your audience has no time to decipher an ad. There are too many other things they could be doing with their time, right there on the screens in front of them, competing for their attention.

Make sure your ad tells your audience what they are going to get if they click through — what you’re offering and how they are going to feel as a result of accepting what you’re offering. No more, no less.

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2. Speak directly to your audience.

“Thinking about selling your house?”

“Do you know what to expect during the homebuying process?”

“What can you do to get more money from your home sale?”

I start off a lot of my ads with questions because it attracts the right people and gets them to act. If you see an ad that opens with a question and your response is “nope,” then you’re going to keep scrolling right on past the ad.

Perfect! That’s exactly what you want your Facebook audience to do. It saves you time and money. Someone who clicks on your ad costs you a lot more money than someone who just sees it. You want to weed people out before they click your ad so that the people who do click have a higher chance of converting into leads and don’t waste your money!

This is why targeting the right audience is critical. If you target your audience and combine questions correctly, someone can feel like an ad was created just for them.

3. Make it emotional.

You offer valuable knowledge and service as a real estate agent, right? That means your clients are “lost” in some way, and you’re there to guide and help them.

Extreme?! Yes, I know. Most of us are not going around telling people that our job is to find lost homebuyers and sellers. People involved in a real estate transaction probably aren’t trying to get a prescription for an anxiety medication, but they are nervous. It’s a significant life event! That means there is a lot of emotion attached to it.

This makes writing emotional text for real estate ads pretty straightforward. Consider the anxieties that your readers are having and their perspectives, and understand how those emotions help (or hinder) the homebuying process. Then speak to those emotions.

4. Make it third-grade simple.

“Find out what your home is worth. Click here.”

This can work for any ad. Don’t add fluff — just a clear call to action offering some fundamental information to start the process.

A caveat on calls to action:

Don’t be afraid to add text that may seem too obvious or direct like “click here to find out” or “get your free guide here.” Lots of people need step-by-step instructions on how to proceed.

These tips probably won’t be as valuable as a money tree, but they will really help increase your return on investment for your online advertising. They are quick, simple and timeless.

Let me hear your tips in the comments!

Ethan Edwards is a marketing content and product developer for Opesta.

Email Ethan Edwards.