Technology

RealtyJuggler CRM lives up to its namesake

RealtyJuggler manages marketing, sales, transactions -- and customers

Have suggestions for products that you’d like to see reviewed by our real estate technology expert? Email Craig Rowe.

The pitch

A big part of finding the right real estate CRM (customer relationship manager) is making sure it’s the right fit for your operation. Maybe the capability is outstanding, but it’s too hard to learn. Or maybe your team just isn’t ready to commit to a uniform approach to managing their sales process.

RealtyJuggler is a CRM that is priced so aggressively I can’t help but think it’s at least worth a shot for any small team or agency that’s been on the fence about investing in a CRM.

Shall we find out?

The sale

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RealtyJuggler is straightforward about being a CRM for real estate agents. It doesn’t attach itself to some higher purpose above that of helping you better manage customers and sales. I’m down. If that’s what you do, it’s that much easier for a user to hold your features accountable.

Each user will run you $99 per year. The 90-day free trial is more than enough time for a team to know if it’s what they need.

RealtyJuggler_ssImportantDates

As far as CRM features go, RealtyJuggler is on pace with the much pricer end of the market. Users are offered drip campaigns that can be executed via email or … wait for it … actual paper letters. Allow me to digress:

I think the real estate industry can do significantly better in its effort to eschew paper-based transactions. It’s kind of a shame, actually.

Nevertheless, the traditional marketer in me believes soundly that there is still a place for print in your media mix. (I have a marketing client who’s been sending a printed quarterly newsletter for 20-plus years, and it earns new business every time.)

A printed, hand-signed personal letter? Even better.

RealtyJuggler_ssTasks

RealtyJuggler has a ton of letter templates to choose from, many emanating from the Dave Beson LetterWriter program. They’re going to need some editing touches (way too many exclamation points for my taste), but the framework is there, so just apply your curb appeal. Or write your own and save those.

Also standing out in the RealtyJuggler lineup of features is its online feedback form for open houses. Share the link with your visitors and the comments stream directly into the related listing. There’s no better way to adjust your seller’s mindset about their listing than to show them direct market feedback.

As its name does not subtly imply, RealtyJuggler manages a bunch of items related to marketing, sales and transactions. Remember, there’s getting the business and then there’s doing the business, so the integration of all three branches of the real estate sales cycle is critical. If you want to get the most out of a CRM, you have to value every bit of data that streams across your browser.

I’m not in love with the interface. The icons are dated, and some of the processes are clinical. It’s not overly engaging. However, it is practical and task-oriented. Again, RealtyJuggler is about being a CRM; it clearly invests its programming hours in functionality. And users should be happy about that.

RealtyJuggler_ssFeatures

You’d be hard-pressed to find a contact source that RealtyJuggler won’t talk to when it comes time to transport customer data from other sources, even Gmail. Its YouTube library of support and training resources is superb.

RealtyJuggler is also mobile on both iOS and Android, a nice value-add. You can create marketing fliers, track office expenses and connect website leads. All the basics are there.

The close

RealtyJuggler was developed by real estate agents, a factor that should not be overlooked when considering how it overlaps with your efforts. When I buy a piece of climbing gear, I want to know if it was built by a company started by rock climbers, or a sporting goods brand wanting a part of the climbing market.

I also like RealtyJuggler’s ongoing evolution. It continues to add features and find different ways to help its users. Like all CRMs, you don’t need every facet of it, but there’s more than enough here for you to be better at the things you’re already doing.

Smaller independent teams and individual agents looking to exact change in the way they compete for market business should give RealtyJuggler its 90-day trial.

Do you use RealtyJuggler? What do you think? Leave a comment and let us know!

Do you have a product for our tech expert to review? Email Craig Rowe.