The Robert and Anne Dickey House, a four-story townhouse designated in 2005 as an individual landmark, is now approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission to join construction for a mixed-use tower. Overall plans consist of a 476-seat public school, 85 condo units and Greenwich Street retail space.

  • Dan Kaplan of FXFOWLE Architects put forth modifications on the tower’s designs after it received push back upon first review in February.
  • Also altered in the new plan is the height of the first floor on the Dickey House, which will now be lowered.
  • The development, operated under Trinity Place Holdings, calls for 85 high-end condos, 7,000 square-feet of retail space and a 476-seat elementary school.
  • Deborah Berke Partners, the design team in charge of the project, plans to “reuse” the interior of the Dickey House, while the exterior is to be restored.

The Robert and Anne Dickey House, a four-story townhouse designated in 2005 as an individual landmark, is now approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission to join construction for a mixed-use tower. Overall plans consist of a 476-seat public school, 85 condo units and Greenwich Street retail space.

Dan Kaplan of FXFOWLE Architects put forth modifications on the tower’s designs after it received push back upon first review in February. The chief concerns commission members voiced were the three cantilever portions of the tower, which were previously set to hang above the landmark in four and 12 feet increments.

67 Greenwich St. tower revised rendering/

67 Greenwich St. tower revised rendering/FXFOWLE Architects

To comply with LPC parameters, the overhang portions were scaled back to two feet, six feet and 10 feet, according to a YIMBY report.

Requests to FXFOWLE Architects for comment were not returned.

Also altered in the new plan is the height of the first floor on the Dickey House, which will now be lowered. The committee was also opposed a yellow sign on the south end of the property, which was removed — something LPC chair Meenakshi Srinivasan called a “no-brainer.”

The development, operated under Trinity Place Holdings, calls for 85 high-end condos, 7,000 square-feet of retail space and a 476-seat elementary school serving District 2 in Manhattan.

“We are happy to share that we anticipate construction of the project starting this year,” said Matthew Messinger, President & CEO of Trinity Place Holdings Inc. “We are also proud to be working with the New York City School Construction Authority in connection with their efforts to bring a much needed, new public school to Lower Manhattan. As Downtown Manhattan continues to see more than $30 billion of public and private investments come to fruition, we expect 77 Greenwich to be the latest milestone in the neighborhood’s evolution as a highly desirable live-work community.”

The Dickey House was first constructed as a three-and-a-half story townhouse in the early 1800s, then converted in 1872. The last time major construction broke was in 1922, when a one-story rear addition was added before it was deemed a landmark ten years ago, according to the LPC designation list.

The tower is projected to reach 500 feet, with the school portion at the base covered in limestone and glass, according to Trinity. Deborah Berke Partners, the design team in charge of the project, plans to “reuse” the interior of the Dickey House, while the exterior is to be restored with the utmost care.

The site has been vacant since 2008, when men’s retail store Syms closed its doors, bought air rights from neighboring properties, filed for bankruptcy and then emerged as Trinity Place Holdings.

Email Jennifer Riner

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