Starting off a development section at Global Connect designated for virtual reality, video and aerial photography, president of Circle Visions Bob Yuan compared the world of real estate to the iPhone.

“When you got [an iPhone], you looked at the box, and the box itself is so beautiful that right there you set the expectation that whatever comes out of the box is going to be top-notch quality,” Yuan said.

  • Videos for your listing should be no more than one minute
  • Wall Street Journal is delivered branded content through a major real estate advertiser
  • Your listing videos should leave the view with anticipation to see the property

Starting off a development section at Global Connect designated for virtual reality, video and aerial photography, president of Circle Visions Bob Yuan compared the world of real estate to the iPhone.

“When you got [an iPhone], you looked at the box, and the box itself is so beautiful that right there you set the expectation that whatever comes out of the box is going to be top-notch quality,” Yuan said.

He applied this mentality to real estate photography and video. If the website, video and photography is beautiful, then they will approach the house with the same anticipation.

Yuan’s Circle Visions offers drone photography, 3-D video scanning and photography.

Samantha DeBianchi pointed out to agents that although the investment can be steep (Yuan referenced fees up to $4,000), it shows potential clients just what you as an agent are willing to do to sell their property.

When drones are most effective

The focus then shifted to Dan Burton, owner of Dronebase. His view, as far as his client should be concerned, is that time is of the essence.

“I think the most effective, again, is that these have to be very quick: People’s attention spans are very short,” he said. The most effective video should be no more than one minute.

He outlined basic shots — far away, close-up, retreating — and price points starting in the low hundreds.

DeBianchi shared an anecdote about a time when she was unable to photograph the amenities of a building — but with a drone’s capabilities, she was able to showcase them.

Where photographs shine

Publisher Brad Inman interviewed David Lennon, global creative director for the Wall Street Journal, about his efforts to generate interest in the real estate world through a publication.

Lennon shared how WSJ is combining the ability to share stories with a major advertiser by cross-pollinating content with listings. He was clear that this section of WSJ is branded content and does not cross the wall into editorial.

Going virtual

Inman steered the conversation to virtual and augmented reality. Yuan addressed the differences — mainly how augmented reality is an extension of reality with help from complex visuals.

Lennon spoke about virtual reality and contended that 360-degree video is actually better — or at least being better utilized in the industry — even though virtual reality can be more immersive.

All three panel speakers concluded that the best drone video, 360-degree video or 3-D scanning is centered around the service provider you choose: If you need the visuals, know the story you wish to tell, and research your provider.

Email Britt Chester

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