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Several U.S. cities suffer from concentrated poverty

Think tank recommends action by Congress to alleviate segregated neighborhoods
Published on Oct 14, 2005

New Orleans was not alone in the United States as a large city with a high rate of concentrated poverty, according to a study by The Brookings Institution, an independent, nonpartisan think tank. The paper, "Katrina's Window: Confronting Concentrated Poverty Across America," argues that something must be done to reduce the segregation of poor families into distressed neighborhoods. Hurricane Katrina "has reinvigorated a dialogue on race and class in America," according to the paper, which was authored by Alan Berube, a fellow at The Brookings Institution Metropolitan Policy Program, and Bruce Katz, director of the Brookings Institution Metropolitan Policy Program. "Overall, nearly 50,000 poor New Orleanians lived in neighborhoods where the poverty rate exceeded 40 percent. New Orleans ranked second among the nation's 50 largest cities on the degree to which its poor families, mostly African American, were clustered in extremely poor neighborhoods," the paper states. "In these place...

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