AgentMarketing

5 steps to take your listing presentation to the next level

Don't be afraid to give up the good for the great
  • A day or two days before your initial appointment, get them on the phone for 10 or 15 minutes, and ask some open-ended questions to get at their current circumstances, their desired change and the various factors that will either help or hinder their effort.
  • During the presentation, don't let your drive to be thorough diminish your ability to pick up and play off the clues of your potential clients.
  • At the beginning of your meeting, I suggest that you introduce your CDF or clarification data form. You then review the CDF toward the end to ensure that you've captured them all accurately, and promise to get back to them within 24 hours with the answers.

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When you walk into appointments with every line scripted and rehearsed, you run the risk of steamrolling your clients and your chances.

Anxiety, adrenaline and note memorization leave some agents unresponsive to what their clients want and need. If your presentation is exactly the same for every client, you’re a robot — not a professional.

Here are some simple steps to help elevate your preparation and presentation:

Step 1: Know your value

What do you bring to the client’s table? Why should they choose you? What will you do to help them reach their goals? Your perspective client’s motivation is based on perceived benefits less perceived costs.

You must be well-prepared to present the benefits you offer succinctly and in the best light possible.

Step 2: Do your homework

What can you piece together about your client? If they’re selling, research the property, neighborhood, school system and surrounding community.

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If they’re buying, become well-informed about any target areas they might be considering.

Step 3: Be sure to pre-qualify

A day or two days before your initial appointment, get them on the phone for 10 or 15 minutes, and ask some open-ended questions to get at their current circumstances, their desired change and the various factors that will either help or hinder their effort.

Take good notes. What seems like the smallest detail could end up tipping the scales in your favor later on.

Step 4: Be a detective

When you arrive for your appointment, be sure to have your antenna up. During the presentation, don’t let your drive to be thorough diminish your ability to pick up and play off the clues of your potential clients.

Don’t feel compelled to use all of your content just because you prepared a lot. Be ready to cut content or to change direction if you sense irritation or boredom.

Step 5: Preset your people

At the beginning of your meeting, I suggest that you introduce your CDF, or clarification data form. You explain that you use this form to collect all the questions that your new clients raise during your presentation that require a considered response.

You then review the CDF toward the end of the exchange to ensure that you’ve captured them all accurately. Promise to get back to them within 24 hours with the answers to their questions via email or phone.

The bottom line is you don’t have to have all the answers right away; you don’t want to make anything up, and the CDF process is proof that you’re listening

John D. Rockefeller said, “Don’t be afraid to give up the good for the great.”

If you do all you can to create excellent sales presentations but never consider your audience, you’ll top out at good. If you go the extra steps and work with your audience, the sky is the limit.

Brian McKenna manages two residential resale offices for Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, Blake. You can follow him on Twitter and on Facebook.

Email Brian McKenna.