We always have to be prepared to lead buyers in the best way possible to get their dream home. But what happens when the clients are actually a couple that refuses to agree? Here are some tips on how to make the process work for everyone.

Last year, we saw some serious panic selling as new tax rules were implemented that could have an impact on homeowners. Now things are starting to settle down, and the need for real estate marches on.

People are looking for homes, and we are looking for those people to sell them to, which means being prepared to lead the client in the best way possible to get them into their dream home.

But what happens when the client is actually two clients, and those two clients refuse to agree? That can be a recipe for a frustrating and time-consuming selling process. It may even lead to you being fired for not properly navigating each person’s demands, whether they contradict one another or not.

Give them the hard facts

First of all, you might be tempted to sugar coat things to keep both parties calm and happy. This isn’t always the best tactic. When one or both of the clients are making a demand that could cost them more money, or not compromising in a way that gives them a better pool of listings, they are the ones losing out. You should make that clear.

Sure, one client is adamant that there be a swimming pool at the house. Meanwhile, the other is demanding a space large enough for a fully functional vegetable garden that grows enough to harvest for an entire season of canning.

If all of the houses in their price range require them to sacrifice house size for yard size, they better be willing to do that.

Point them toward trends

Sometimes the clients think they know what they want, but they really have no clue. Their fond memories of the 1970s furnished house they grew up in just aren’t realistic in today’s world where modern updating has led to a very different style.

Instead, start pointing out the latest trends that are hot on the market right now. Show them what they could have, and start reforming that vision so both parties end up on the same page. Help them fall in love with what is in front of them, not behind them.

Be realistic

Let’s say you have one client who is wanting a house with six bedrooms, two of which can be used for personal space for himself and his wife. The other client agrees to these terms, but she has her heart set on a suburb that is known for being pricey due to its excellent schools. Their price point is about $100,000 less than it would take to meet both demands.

Gently explain this to them, providing evidence of the listings that cater to both priorities. Then start talking about compromises that both clients will have to make to meet in the middle.

They could have a four-bedroom house in the desired neighborhood within their price point that also comes with a large basement area. That area could be designed as a shared space for the family.

Or there is a six-bedroom house available in a more urban area that still has well-rated school districts but costs much less.

Sugar coating and over-promising on housing features to meet both clients demands is a sure way to disappoint the clients. Delivering hard facts and setting appropriate expectations for what their budget can provide will result in a more-likely agreement.

Start showing like crazy

When the budget doesn’t allow for all of your client’s requests, show examples to support your assumptions.

One of the best ways to make two conflicting partners agree on a home is to show a lot of them, and show all different types.

Show houses that meet their list of requests and what price range these houses fall in. Then you can help them to weed out their wants and needs to find a house more comfortably in their price range.

Slowly, the image in their heads of the perfect home is going to shift. Seeing the other person reacting positively to different features will also have an impact on their perspective.

Before you know it, both clients are going to find a house that they have fallen in love with. You will have made the sale, and they will be happy, even if it isn’t what they expected going into the process.

The point is, to get your buyer clients into their dream home — no one said the dream couldn’t change.

Jackson Cooper is a writer and real estate enthusiast at Jensen and Company. Follow Jensen & Company on Twitter or Facebook.

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