Agents in Maryland say the market has rebounded quickly from the initial shock of the pandemic, but inventory remains low.

The first confirmed cases of coronavirus in Maryland were reported on March 5 by Gov. Larry Hogan: a couple in their 70s and a woman in her 50s who had all recently traveled on a cruise on the Nile River.

On March 30, Gov. Hogan issued a stay-at-home order superseding previous orders enacted mid-March that had prohibited large gatherings and events and closed non-essential businesses.

It’s been a little over three months since those first confirmed cases, and the state began its first phase of reopening on May 15. Gov. Hogan allowed local governments to determine what specific businesses (out of the limited ones the governor’s office allowed to reopen at that time) could reopen based on their own region’s readiness for reopening.

On June 5, the governor moved the state into phase two of reopening, lifting his order closing non-essential businesses and allowing additional businesses to reopen, including real estate offices.

As of June 8, COVID-19 positivity rates had dropped below 8 percent, down more than 72 percent from peak positivity rates in the state recorded in mid-April.

Statewide cases and deaths

  • Maryland had 63,548 confirmed cases of COVID-19 as of June 19
  • The state had suffered 2,901 deaths as of June 19
  • A total of 544,072 COVID-19 tests had been administered as of June 19

Statewide crisis response

  • On March 12, Gov. Hogan activated the National Guard, prohibited mass gatherings of more than 250 people, closed the cruise terminal at Port of Baltimore, suspended visits to correctional facilities, mandated non-essential state employees to teleworking and announced that all schools would close starting on March 16, initially just through the end of March (an order later extended through the end of the academic year). Just days later, all Maryland casinos, racetracks, betting facilities, bars and restaurants were also ordered to close.
  • By March 19, the governor enacted a new order to limit gatherings to 10 people and the closure of malls, bowling alleys and pool halls. Gov. Hogan also urged residents to use public transit for essential travel only, and requested the University System of Maryland Board of Regents finish the remainder of the college semester online.
  • March 23 began the governor’s closure of all non-essential businesses. On March 30 Gov. Hogan issued a stay-at-home order for residents.
  • On May 15 the state entered its first phase of reopening, with restrictions lifted on manufacturing, retail, hair cutting salons and worship services, all of which could resume business at limited capacities.
  • On June 5, the governor moved into phase two of reopening by lifting his order closing non-essential businesses and allowing additional businesses to reopen, including construction, specialty vendors, wholesalers, warehouses and offices. Real estate offices, travel agencies, auto dealer showrooms, banks, and additional personal services like nail salons, tattoo parlors and massage therapists were also allowed to reopen, as were state government offices.

Statewide real estate

  • The median sales price for all homes in Maryland during May 2020 was $320,000, up 2.6 percent from $312,000 the year before, according to Maryland Realtors, the state’s Realtors association.
  • Sales closed during May were down 32.4 percent year-over-year to 6,055 from 8,962 in May 2019. Pending units for the month were 9,502, up slightly from 9,286 in May 2019.
  • Inventory took a hit in 2020 with active inventory dropping to 13,838 in May 2020 down from 25,329 the year before. There were 1.9 months of inventory available in May 2020 compared to 3.6 months in May 2019.
  • Total dollar volume also sharply decreased year-over-year from $3,253,105,785 in May 2019 to $2,204,815,725 in May 2020.
  • On March 19, Maryland Realtors posted a COVID-19 addendum to its forms page. About one month later, the association also made available on its website a COVID-19 addendum to listing agreements.
  • On March 30, Gov. Hogan authorized remote notarizations and enacted a stay-at-home order.
  • On June 5 real estate offices were allowed to reopen under phase two of the governor’s plan to reopen the state economy.

Downtown Baltimore | Atlantide Phototravel / Getty Images

Baltimore County (Baltimore)

Confirmed cases as of June 19: 7,403

Deaths as of June 19: 442

Baltimore has long been a major seaport in the U.S. and is where Francis Scott Key was moved to write “The Star-Spangled Banner” as U.S. soldiers rose an American flag over Fort McHenry during the War of 1812. Today, Baltimore County is home to about 827,370 according to population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau in 2019.

Units sold in Baltimore County was down 35.9 percent year-over-year from 1,110 units in May 2019 to 711 units in May 2020, according to Maryland Realtors. The median sales price rose by 1.8 percent from $250,000 in May 2019 to $254,450 in May 2020.

Pending units also declined slightly from 1,194 units in May 2019 to 1,179 units in May 2020. Active inventory nearly halved year-over-year to 1,360 active units from 2,618 units in May 2019. Months of inventory also dropped from 2.9 months in May 2019 to 1.5 months in May 2020.

Annapolis | Westend61 / Getty Images

Anne Arundel County (Annapolis, Glen Burnie, Pasadena)

Confirmed cases as of June 19: 4,862

Deaths as of June 19: 198

Anne Arundel County is where Maryland’s capital, Annapolis is located. The city is centrally situated in the state on the Chesapeake Bay, and is home to the United States Naval Academy and the domed 1700s-era Maryland State House. Anne Arundel County’s population was last estimated at 579,234 in 2019 according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Units sold dropped 30.2 percent from 1,004 units in May 2019 to 701 units in May 2020, according to Maryland Realtors. Pending units rose modestly year-over-year from 1,035 pending units in May 2019 to 1,142 in May 2020.

The median sales price ticked up by 2.6 percent from $359,800 in May 2019 to $369,000 in May 2020.

There were only 1,423 units in active inventory in May 2020 compared to 2,707 the previous year. Months of available inventory declined from 3.5 months in May 2019 to 1.7 months in May 2020.

Downtown Silver Spring | Lillian Dickerson

Montgomery County (Bethesda, Rockville, Silver Spring)

Confirmed cases as of June 19: 13,928

Deaths as of June 19: 710

Montgomery County is the most populous county in Maryland, containing about 1,050,688 people according to 2019 U.S. Census Bureau estimates. The county is just northwest of Washington, D.C. and cities like Bethesda and Silver Spring are widely considered part of the D.C. metro area by many residents.

Units sold in May 2020 dropped by 38.9 percent to 860 units, down from 1,408 units the year before, according to Maryland Realtors. Pending units declined from 1,465 pending units in May 2019 to 1,183 pending units in May 2020.

The median sales price rose by 3.5 percent year-over-year to $481,500, up from $465,000 in May 2019.

Active inventory significantly declined from 2,754 units in May 2019 to 1,504 units in May 2020. Available months of inventory also dropped from 2.7 months in May 2019 to 1.4 months in May 2020.

Fort Frederick | Matt Champlin / Getty Images

Washington County (Hagerstown, Clear Spring, Maugansville)

Confirmed cases as of June 19: 601

Deaths as of June 19: 25

Washington County is located in the western portion of the state. In 2019, the U.S. census bureau estimated the county’s population at 151,049 people. The county is the first in the U.S. to be named after the nation’s first president, George Washington.

Units sold in Washington County dropped by 34.8 percent from 187 units sold in May 2019 to 122 units sold in May 2020, according to Maryland Realtors. Units pending rose slightly year-over-year to 212 units pending in May 2020, up from 200 the previous year.

The median sales price on all homes rose 20.5 percent from $190,000 in May 2019 to $229,000 in May 2020.

Active inventory dropped dramatically year-over-year from 645 active units of inventory in May 2019 to 354 units in May 2020. Months of inventory likewise declined to 2.3 months of inventory available in May 2020 from 4.2 months the year before.

Ocean City | Kat Keeling / Unsplash

Worcester County (Ocean City, Newark, Cedartown)

Confirmed cases as of June 19: 267

Deaths as of June 19: 17

Worcester County is the south-easternmost county in Maryland, encompassing both the Pocomoke State Forest and Assateague Island National Seashore. The county is home to Ocean City, a popular resort town with beaches, a boardwalk featuring restaurants and shops, and plenty of water recreation options. In 2019, Worcester County had an estimated population of 52,276, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Total units sold took a hit of 44.3 percent between May 2019 and May 2020 from 264 units sold down to 147, respectively. Units pending, however, rose year-over-year from 247 pending units in May 2019 to 361 pending units in May 2020.

The median sales price dropped modestly to $245,000 in May 2020 down from $267,000 the previous year.

Meanwhile, active inventory declined significantly year-over-year to a mere 726 active units in May 2020 down from 1,222 active units in May 2019. Months of inventory dropped from 6.1 months of inventory available in May 2019 down to 3.7 months in May 2020.

Additional resources

  • Maryland Realtors continues to update its website regularly with new information relevant to the COVID-19 pandemic as it becomes available.
  • The Maryland Real Estate Commission has a coronavirus updates resource webpage as it relates to licenses through the Maryland Department of Labor website.
  • The Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development has published on its website guidelines for mortgages affected by COVID-19.
  • The Coastal Association of Realtors, which services Somerset, Wicomico and Worcester Counties, also has a COVID-19 resources page on its website with information about association updates, financial resources, health resources, legal updates and more.

Email Lillian Dickerson

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