The house that Kiss frontman Gene Simmons lived in for more than 25 years is now up for sale for $22 million.

Simmons and his wife, model Sharon Tweed, first moved into 2650 Benedict Canyon Drive in 1984 after buying it for $1.35 million.

At 16,000 square feet, the Beverly Hills estate fits the bill for even a rockstar’s wildest desires — seven bedrooms, a 40-foot entry foyer, a parking lot for 35 cars, a professional tennis court, a pool with a 60-foot water slide and over two acres of outdoor space.

The exterior of the property is built in the style of a European chateau while the interior is full of rockstar-worthy amenities. Simmons and Tweed had raised their two kids, born in 1989 and 1992, in the mansion before deciding to move to a 24-acre estate in Washington’s Mount Rainier to escape California’s heavy taxes.

Douglas Elliman’s Josh and Matt Altman are the listing agents representing the property, now listed for $22 million.

“California and Beverly Hills have been treating folks that create jobs badly and the tax rates are unacceptable,” Simmons told the Wall Street Journal. “I work hard and pay my taxes and I don’t want to cry the Beverly Hills blues but enough is enough.”

After buying the lot with an older property on it, Simmons and Tweed tore it down and spent five years designing the existing structure themselves — from stone walls and curving staircases to the full-size trees that they had brought in in trucks for the outdoor garden.

Remnants of Simmons’ rockstar life remain in multiple places in the house — from original concert posters from the 1970s to a room full of Hello Kitty memorabilia from Kiss’ collaboration with the Japanese brand — but will not be sold with the house. As Simmons told the WSJ, they are too meaningful for his family.

“We did everything from condoms to caskets,” Simmons said. “We’ll get you coming and we’ll get you going.”

Kiss, which formed in New York City in 1973 and quickly gained recognition as one of the best-selling rock bands of all time, is known for its elaborate performances — white face paint, use of fire and pyrotechnics on stage, as well as songs like  “Rock and Roll All Nite” and “I Was Made for Lovin’ You.”

Simmons, who along with Paul Stanley are the only two members to stay with the band throughout its history, is also known for his controversial media appearances.

“You can open the doors and walk out on your balcony like Mussolini waving out at his fascist crowd,” Simmons joked of the several wrought-iron terraces on the property.

Email Veronika Bondarenko

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