News Brief

Top comments of the week Sept. 5-9

Gathered for you in one place

Here are Inman News’ top comments from across the site, compiled by the editorial staff.


Connie Martin · Commented on Agents: Stop taking rejection personally — it’ll cost you

Much easier said than done. I think communication is the best thing I got from your article.

I just recently lost a client that I had sold two homes to and had been a resource for him in several refinances.

He went with a brand new agent for a very low commission. When I had asked about selling his investment property he said he was not ready. But then listed it with the other agent.

I think the deception was the most devastating. I felt that when he needed a good agent he called me for my expertise and experience, but when it was time to pay for that experience he passed. I felt used. I did get over it and moved on.

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But it is not easy when you really care about your clients. I guess sales and easy are an oxymoron.


Matthew Rodriguez · Commented on FSBO and expired listing prospecting: 11 tips for real estate agents

Why is every real estate agent afraid to be a salesman? Take a look at your license and see what it says.

There are 3 different kinds of agents. First, is the order taker. These agents are only able to close the “Lay down” deals.

Second, we have the consultant. These agents focus on guiding agreeable clients who may have some minor objections.

Lastly come the salesmen; these individuals can take a non-agreeable individual and box him in with logic and emotion. He overcomes every objection and persuades even the most opposed individual to hire him. He does this because he truly knows his service is the absolute best. Take a guess who makes the most in the industry? You are either selling him on your service or he is selling you on why you aren’t worth the license you hold.


Michele Veltum Frederick · Commented on Dual Agency Real Estate Case Heads To California’s Highest Court

Several notes:

1) Designated agency–call it what you want. It’s still dual agency. And Broker still gets both sides. I don’t see the industry moving toward single agency any time soon (except for the Exclusive Buyer Agency Brokerages) So what is the solution??

2) The industry (along with appraisers, builders, inspectors, etc) needs to clarify the square footage dilemma. Our MLS doesn’t even have a field for it, and I would assume the reason comes down to lawsuits in the past about this very issue.

3) My biggest issue here is not with Cortazzo, but with the agent who purportedly was “working for the Buyer”–Namba. Especially with the issue of translation involved, and even without it, we as professionals should NEVER say that something is a “standard form” and only needs your signature. ALL of the forms we use are standard to us, but to the consumers, it may be their very first time reading them. EVER. And may be the ONLY time they ever have to read them. Why in the world do we have all of the forms and disclosures if they aren’t for reading, understanding and acknowledging????? Answer: To indemnify the broker from post-settlement litigation-!!!!

It sounds to me like “written advisories” were repeatedly put in front of Horiike, and he signed them. Notice of an issue, signature of acknowledging the issue, and not doing anything more about it–shame on the BUYER. WAIVE YOUR RIGHTS TO POST SETTLEMENT LITIGATION-!!!

Finally, I find it most interesting that Namba was not named as a defendant. Horiike had worked with her for over 4 years. (See the additional info about the case from Bill Wendel’s link http://bit.ly/DOAgency ) That sounds like a very long-term and friendly relationship. (and I don’t mean anything but professional). It’s disappointing that so many want to blame Cortazzo, when the Buyer’s agent is the one who owed fiduciary duty to the Buyer. Looks like Horiike just “liked” his agent too much to think she may have also been at fault.

No matter what happens, no matter how many forms, disclosures, etc. our legal cousins design for agents and brokers, there will always be those clients who will sue for something. And there will always be bigger pockets to sue, and attorneys who will benefit from it in the end.


Daniel Mitchell · Commented on How Old-School Titans Are Joining Forces With New Indie Brokerages

As an senior American Realtor, I remember when all the Real Estate offices were totally different reflecting the personality of the owner, as were the motels, hotels, restaurants, hardware stores, dress shops, mens stores,in fact everything.

Franchising has really boomed since just the ’70s and dumbed down thinking in America. Yea to the kids and the smarter Jersey guys who see that franchising; just copy the next guy is just lazy and very boring. Different is exciting, stimulating and just downright more fun.


Ernest Villafranca · Commented on Agents: Stop taking rejection personally — it’ll cost you

Getting “no” for an answer is part of life.

“A friend who knows you’re a real estate agent and won’t do business with you is not a friend.” Real estate saying.

A neighbor who knows you’re a real estate agent and won’t do business with you is not a neighbor…just someone who lives around you.

A family member who knows you’re…is still a family member. Can’t get around that. But, you don’t have to give them too much time, You know?

Yes, people do what they do for a reason. Sometimes I’m not the best option. All I ask of my family and friends is that they give me the chance to compete.

After that, I let it go, and focus on what is right with my life.

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