ICNY 18: How biometrics could make real estate safer

Clear CEO Caryn Seidman-Becker on offering a 'more secure customer experience'

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NEW YORK — Biometric identification could affect more than checking in at an airport — it could even change how agents handle open houses.

Caryn Seidman-Becker, CEO of the biometrics startup Clear, joined Inman founder Brad Inman on stage at Inman Connect New York on Thursday to describe how her startup works and how it could affect the future of real estate.

Clear’s technology lets users register their fingerprints and connect that identifier to the information on their driver’s licenses. Then Clear users can check in by fingerprint at the airport instead of pulling out their license. It lets customers skip the line for ID check, even if they still have to wait for TSA’s physical screening.

“It’s a better customer experience. It’s a more secure customer experience,” Seidman-Becker said. “You are always you.”

Right now, the main appeal of Clear is skipping lines. About 30 airports and sports stadiums nationwide accept Clear, letting customers who are willing to pay $179 a year cut through regular security.

The technology probably won’t appeal to those worried about providing so much personal and biometric information to a private company, even though Seidman-Becker assured the audience that security is the company’s top priority. Clear users use fingerprints right now, but biometric technology also uses iris scans and facial recognition.

But there are more applications beyond a quicker check-in at the airport.

“You have an open house and you let every wahoo, crazy chucklehead walk in. They come to my house, they’re in my private house and they can steal my underwear — they can do all kinds of things,” Inman theorized. “You could have a fingerprint reader on the door or you could use facial recognition.”

An open house with check-in by fingerprint is probably at least a few years away, but this technology is developing its practical applications quickly.

“Building trust takes time,” Seidman-Becker said, “but biometrics have gone mainstream.”

Read all of our coverage from Inman Connect NY 2018.

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