News Brief

Top comments of the week Sept. 12-16

Insights that stood out

Here are Inman News’ top comments from across the site, compiled by the editorial staff.


Bryan Hoffman · Commented on How To Live Through — And Explain — Uncertainty

I tell my luxury buyers to hold off on almost a daily basis. At least until the 2nd or 3rd quarter of next year to see how several factors play out (stock market correction, election, etc). It’s in their best interest. I do hope every agent has their clients best interest at heart and not seeing only commissions to drive advice.


Alice Galeotti · Commented on How To Master The Downsizing Conversation With Clients

Timely artice for me personally. As new empty-nesters deciding whether to downsize from the three-story, 4,000 square-foot house, my husband and I are having this same discussion about size, proximity to activities, and walkability.

6 ways empowered agents embrace disruption to drive success
Using technology to generate leads and win listings READ MORE

I do love some of the separate spaces in our home (library, art studio, office), but hate the yard I used to enjoy gardening in and am annoyed by living in a family-oriented neighborhood (you try getting woken up every night by a teenager’s modified car before you judge me).

The hardest part is how much WORK downsizing involves and how much STUFF needs to be gone before a smaller space will work. I might love living smaller, but getting there is a huge mountain to climb for two hard-working adults.


Faith Jackson-Curry · Commented on Why it’s crucial for women to create a real estate portfolio

$10K sounds like a downpayment on a mortgage. What about the initial cost of the house? mmm… I didn’t see any mention made of carrying costs in the calculations. What about vacancies, reserves for repairs, routine maintenance? This is a little too glossy a reality from my personal experience in property investment.


Larry Milligan ·Commented on Millennials aren’t alone — no one is buying a house

I disagree. Many people are just buying houses and few are buying “dreams” these days. In 2005 people were buying into the “dream” of getting rich flipping with no money and no credit.

Prior to that some first time home buyers and second home/vacation buyers were buying into their dream, but these days many buyers take a more pragmatic approach. Some of the reasons were listed in John’s article, but there are more – not the least of which is that many people don’t qualify for financing and can’t pay cash.

Particularly in States like Florida where a large percentage of people who would like to buy simply cannot because of past short sales and foreclosures, transitioning to self-employment, etc.

The “dream” applies mainly to first time homebuyers, which most Millenials would be and John’s reasons for why they’re not buying are true, but most home purchases are not by Millenials and have nothing to do with the “dream”.

The majority of people buy these days because it makes sense for them, not because they’re dreaming. They’re tired of moving, of rent going up every year, of not building equity, of not being able to have pets or customizing their home to their tastes or fighting with landlords over repairs and on and on.

It’s about lifestyle preferences, finances and practicalities.

The dream can still be there for first timers and vacation home buyers, but everybody else (who can qualify) are still just buying houses.


John Kotrides · Commented on Millennials aren’t alone — no one is buying a house

I don’t think we actually disagree at all Larry.

Specific to your reply, for some the “dream” may be the reasons you list — because they dream of settling (tired of moving), being more financially secure (rent going up every year), wanting freedom to live their lives in their own way (having pets and customizing).

Obviously for millennials and all generations, new hurdles to homeownership apply and you’ve done a great job summarizing those.

That makes the dream harder to achieve, but as a result people are REALLY focusing on the dream aspect because often, the house that their finances can practically provide isn’t really that special – the HOME it becomes can still be. :-)

Email Caroline Feeney