News Brief

Top comments of the week Nov. 7-11

Readers weigh in on stories across the site

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A little something called the presidential election made this a news-heavy week for the country — and real estate.

In addition to naming someone from the property world as President-elect, the National Association of Realtors wrapped up its annual conference, we learned more about how America’s commissions compare to the rest of the world and a disturbing case in South Carolina got everyone talking about barriers to entry.

Here are this week’s top comments on all that and more from across the site, compiled by the editorial staff.


Sherri Noel · Commented on What does President Trump mean for the housing market?

It’s over now we need to move forward. He wasnt my first choice but it is what it is and a bend in the road isnt the end of the road unless you fail to make the turn. Let’s get back on track.


Desiree Patno · Commented on Why having women at the top is just good business

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Nice to see a soft tone of you aren’t going to please everyone yet at the same time women need to be more resilent and collaborate to get more women to engage. We are working hard at NAWRB to create this mindset within the industries throughout the housing ecosystem. More women in the boardrooms with a seat at the table, creates more mentors and sponsors, develops into more diverse spend, greater women’s homeownership and cycles to reduce women’s poverty. What a great ecosystem!


Kathryn Stelljes · Commented on What does President Trump mean for the housing market?

I think it’s pretty easy to see that we have no idea what will happen with the real estate industry, or anything for that matter, because our president-elect ran on a platform devoid of real policy. If he had policies then we could go to each of these points and say here’s what to expect. But we can’t and the author has really made it apparent that all of these issues are unknowns because Trump failed to mention his plans and/or mentioned them in such vague detail that we don’t really know what his intentions are.


Beth Ross · Commented on Realtor in serial murder case never got a background check

I firmly believe and advocate for BACKGROUND CHECKS on ALL licensee’s every time they go for renewal and when they get their initial license. Who is to say someone doesn’t committ a felony that is of horrific nature after they get their license. People, buyers and sellers, put their trust in us and yet we don’t take the initiative to make it mandatory for background checks in our industry. Goodness, we are in their homes, with their loved ones, and often in very vulnerable situations, not only for us, but for the public as well. I have no problem getting background checks for the companies I work for as an REO and BPO broker. I actually have to have three or four with different back ground companies each year. Yes it costs me money, but at least my clients know I am a good risk. Anyone that objects to them, may be hiding something. In my humble opinion!! It is tragedies such as this one, that make me wonder how many others are out there that a simple background check could have averted any situations!!!


Eric Sotelo · Commented on Two bodies found on Realtor’s property identified
This deeply saddens me. I am a licensed realtor and also an UBER Driver in the Houston Area. The City of Houston has required all UBERS to have their CITY TAXI LICENSES. This process includes a very deep FBI BACKGROUND, WARRANTS CHECK, AND FINGERPRINTS CHECK among other things. The total cost for this is around $200 every two years.

I think maybe the N.A.R. would look into doing a more investigative background check like this. It would definitely give the community a better feeling knowing that we have been vetted.

Just a thought..


Julie Carpenter · Commented on Commissions fall worldwide, but remain high in U.S

A number of national economic factors are at play but are not accounted for in this study. For example, in the “low & mid-range commission” countries there is universal health care, paid maternity & paternity leave, state-supported education and care for elderly & disabled, and of course, often much higher taxes. In the US, Realtors pay for their own health care, education and whatever “welfare” aka retirement savings, etc we can muster. Internationally speaking, U.S. taxes are low. As with everything; “the devil is in the details.

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