All-glass garage doors are one of the hottest emerging home design trends right now. HomeAdvisor’s Dan DiClerico shares what homeowners, sellers and buyers need to know.

Revamped bedrooms, bathrooms, and kitchens are usually at the center of sellers’ renovation checklist and rightfully so — a simple coat of paint in these areas can yield a return on investment worth thousands. However, exterior upgrades are often limited to planting new flowers and cutting the yard.

For sellers looking go the extra mile on curb appeal, all-glass garage doors are an emerging trend that instantly breathes life into an old home with an ROI of more than 97 percent.

Dan DiClerico

“I would really describe this trend as emerging and I think this trend is driven by aesthetics and plays particularly well with a contemporary style of architecture,” HomeAdvisor smart home strategist and design expert Dan DiClerico told Inman. “It’s also popular for transitional homes that are combining new and old architecture.”

“For example, you see it more and more with ranch-style homes which kind of have a mid-century flair,” he added. “A glass garage door can provide a sort of interesting modern counterpoint to create that more transitional look.”

DiClerico said all-glass options are often used on detached garages that have been transformed into accessory dwelling units or attached garages that now serve as a workshop or home gym.

“It’s something that we tend to see at the back of the house with an accordion door or just large expanses of window,” he explained. “With the garage, I think the use case there is a garage that’s been converted to some other use.”

“The extreme example would be a detached garage that’s been turned into a mother-in-law flat, and the ground floor of the garage with that glass garage door might house the kitchen and the living area with private space above,” he continued. “The glass garage door would flood that area with abundant natural light, which is the biggest benefit of a glass door.”

DiClerico also said all-glass doors fit into biophilic design, a trend that aims to “bring the outdoors, indoor” primarily through expansive windows and sliding glass walls.

“I think it also ties into the trend, which I’ve been talking more and more about, of biophilic design for creating interior spaces that foster a connection to nature,”he said.  “It provides a seamless transition to the rest of the property.”

Haas Doors President Jeffrey Nofziger said his Ohio-based company has seen a sharp uptick in requests for all-glass doors as homeowners look to improve the curb appeal of their homes during the pandemic.

“From coast to coast, and everywhere in between, we are getting an increased number of requests for all-glass garage doors,” he said in a statement sent to Inman. “People like the style of these garage doors. The all-glass design increases a home’s curb appeal but can still provide privacy for the homeowners.”

Nofziger, who offers 33 insulated, non-insulated and impact-resistant options, said homeowners favor frosted glass for privacy reasons.

“The last thing we wanted was the loss of privacy in our garage,” a Haas customer said in the statement. “But it’s just the opposite. We gain light through the frosted glass while protecting our privacy.”

DiClerico said frosted glass, which is also known as privacy glass, is the best option, especially if the garage is being used for storage.

“It would make sense to go with tinted or frosted glass because what you’re seeing on the other side isn’t necessarily attractive,” he said.

Although all-glass garage doors are eye-catching, DiClerico said homeowners and sellers should be aware of the downsides, which include cost and weather durability.

The average all-glass garage door costs $3,500 — about three times the cost of a traditional steel or wood door. However, it’s just as durable and can last decades, outside of normal mechanical replacements or maintenance.

“I wouldn’t put its lifespan any less than other materials,” DiClerico said. “[However], I would not recommend them in hurricane country or tornado alley.”

“The glass can be and is often reinforced, so it’s going to be more durable than your average window pane,” he added. “But it’s not going to be anywhere as durable as a steel garage door in those weather conditions.”

Email Marian McPherson.

Show Comments Hide Comments

Comments

Sign up for Inman’s Morning Headlines
What you need to know to start your day with all the latest industry developments
Success!
Thank you for subscribing to Morning Headlines.
Back to top
New sessions have been added to Connect Now Agenda on October 20th! Check out the power-packed lineup. SEE THE AGENDA×