Nobody wants to buy Tom Hanks' old houseboat

Alain Pinel Realtors listing agent Angela McIntyre said only 14 people came to a weekend-long open house for the property

Tom Hanks is one of the world’s most beloved actors — he tugged at our heartstrings with Forrest Gump, renewed our appreciation of volleyballs in Castaway, and he’s sure to inspire us to be a little kinder with his upcoming role as everyone’s favorite neighbor, Mr. Rogers.

Tom Hanks’ former houseboat. (Photo credit: Angela McIntyre, Alain Pinel Realtors)

So it would seem buyers would be in a bidding war to own Hanks’ former houseboat where he lived with his father and stepmother, Amos and Frances, from 1973 to 1976.

But, alas, that’s not the case.

In an interview with realtor.com, Alain Pinel Realtors listing agent Angela McIntyre revealed that two open house events on Oct. 13 and 14 in Alameda, California, had turnouts that certainly weren’t Oscar-worthy. McIntyre said only 14 people toured the home, and only one had seen Hanks’ Twitter and Instagram posts where he confirmed he’d lived there.

McIntyre says she doesn’t think the $600,000 listing price is an issue since the smallest (600 square feet) houseboats in the Barnhill Marina are selling for $400,000, and the largest houseboats (1,700 square feet) are selling for $800,000.

Plus, the current owners overhauled the exterior and added a fiberglass coating that extended the home’s durability for at least another 35 to 40 years.

“This is an incredibly fair price,” she said. “If you’re spending that money, you’re buying to live here. You enjoy the water and want the ability to walk out your door and go paddleboarding.”

“You have no idea how disappointed I am,” McIntyre added. “I thought we were going to be mobbed.”

Although it seems a home’s celebrity connection would be a strong selling point, a 2016 market analysis by Redfin revealed that celebrity homes stayed on the market 36 days longer than comparable properties and often sold below listing price. Ouch.

Harry Norman Realtors’ Jordan Barkin told realtor.com that some interior upgrades may help McIntyre’s sales efforts, since buyers, especially younger ones, won’t be attracted to the beige carpet and cherry wood paneling on the home’s main floor.

“Buy the home for the view, but not much more,” he said.

Email Marian McPherson.