Opinion

How white privilege makes my life easier

I never asked for it, but I was born with it anyway, and it affects me every day -- whether I like it or not
  • Ignoring and avoiding the conversation isn’t the answer -- and neither is hiding behind my white privilege and remaining silent.
  • My son's white privilege means that he can walk into a business or an open house, and he will be treated with respect instead of suspicion.
  • I don’t think I should have to explain that all lives really do matter, but it’s not all lives that are at risk right now -- at least, not to the degree that black lives are at risk.

There are a few things I have in life that I never asked for. Being white is one of them. I never asked to be white and I didn’t ask for white privilege, but it was bestowed upon me. I never had to earn it and I have benefited from it my entire life -- in my education, housing and job opportunities. A week ago, I was ready to unfriend everyone on Facebook who countered and dismissed “Black Lives Matter” with “All Lives Matter,” but I changed my mind. Ignoring and avoiding the conversation isn’t the answer -- and neither is hiding behind my white privilege and remaining silent. I need to speak up for my grandchildren. They haven’t been born yet -- but when they are, some of them will be born without white privilege. My daughter and son-in-law want to move out of Minnesota. It is the most racist state in the United States as measured by income disparity and education gaps and few other measures. The young man, Philando Castile, who was pulled over by poli...