If you’ve ever had to move to another city for a job, you’ll know just how difficult relocating your life can be.

But some parts of the country may be better suited for a fresh start — places like Buffalo, New York; Minneapolis; Salt Lake City; and Austin, Texas; are among some of the most receptive, a new study by online lending exchange LendingTree indicates.

To come to these findings, the study’s authors looked at eight elements that would impact a person’s launch in a new city, including the cost of housing, median income and rates of health insurance coverage at 50 of the largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. To calculate a resident’s chances of landing a good job, the study also examined the number of adults between 35 and 64 who are single, enrolled in school and covered by some form of health insurance.

With its low rents and nearly fully insured (94.2 percent) population, Buffalo outpaced every other U.S. city as the best place in the country for a fresh start.

Minneapolis, Salt Lake City and Austin also fared well, ranking next (and closely) for factors including employment, median income and school enrollment. Seattle, the city that has outpaced San Francisco lately in home values, came in at number 12 on the list.

Credit: LendingTree

Credit: LendingTree

LendingTree Fresh Start Top 25

Credit: LendingTree

As an online marketplace for loans, LendingTree also looked at someone’s chances of recovering from a financial disaster — in particular, debt collector laws and credit scores three years after declaring bankruptcy. When it came to someone’s chances of getting out of debt, Buffalo, Austin, Milwaukee and Boston came out on top.

“[Buffalo] residents who declare bankruptcy have an average credit score of 664 three years on, tied for the second highest score for the cities reviewed, suggesting that conditions are favorable for financial recovery,” the study summary reads.

But those who seek a fresh start in sun-basked parts of the country may be out of luck — Miami; Orlando, Florida; and Riverside, California; all ranked at the very bottom of cities due to high rents and low median incomes.

Email Veronika Bondarenko

Show Comments Hide Comments

Comments

Sign up for Inman’s Morning Headlines
What you need to know to start your day with all the latest industry developments
By submitting your email address, you agree to receive marketing emails from Inman.
Success!
Thank you for subscribing to Morning Headlines.
Back to top
Only 3 days left to register for Inman Connect Las Vegas before prices go up! Don't miss the premier event for real estate pros.Register Now ×
Limited Time Offer: Get 1 year of Inman Select for $199SUBSCRIBE×
Log in
If you created your account with Google or Facebook
Don't have an account?
Forgot your password?
No Problem

Simply enter the email address you used to create your account and click "Reset Password". You will receive additional instructions via email.

Forgot your username? If so please contact customer support at (510) 658-9252

Password Reset Confirmation

Password Reset Instructions have been sent to

Subscribe to The Weekender
Get the week's leading headlines delivered straight to your inbox.
Top headlines from around the real estate industry. Breaking news as it happens.
15 stories covering tech, special reports, video and opinion.
Unique features from hacker profiles to portal watch and video interviews.
Unique features from hacker profiles to portal watch and video interviews.
It looks like you’re already a Select Member!
To subscribe to exclusive newsletters, visit your email preferences in the account settings.
Up-to-the-minute news and interviews in your inbox, ticket discounts for Inman events and more
1-Step CheckoutPay with a credit card
By continuing, you agree to Inman’s Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

You will be charged . Your subscription will automatically renew for on . For more details on our payment terms and how to cancel, click here.

Interested in a group subscription?
Finish setting up your subscription
×