Courted
Recruiting
Inman Rating

Amidst a sea of marketing speak, business-builder Courted never lets agents out of its sights: Tech Review

Courted isn't unlike Side, the team-oriented boutique brokerage builder. It wants good agents to find each other, knowing that's how the industry will best emerge from its current state of uncertain evolution
Courted
Build your referral business

Courted is a software that lets agents find other agents for multiple reasons, whether to refer work, recruit team members or even seek advice or mentorship. It’s an ideal tool for higher-producing agents wanting to broadcast their expertise and empower their in-market professional network.

Are you receiving Inman’s Agent EdgeMake sure you’re subscribed here for the latest on real estate technology from Inman’s expert Craig Rowe.

A better MLS, this app lets agents find the best agents for their listings, the best teams to be a part of and the best way to be a better agent.

Platforms: Mobile-first browser app

Ideal for: Agents and teams

Top selling points:

  • Agent-to-agent model
  • Network/referral search according to performance
  • Activity-specific performance tracking
  • Market-activity social posts
  • Courted “Achievement” awards
  • Experience-based network building

Top concern:

Courted is going to rely heavily on the data partnerships it can forge within each market it’s targeting, and with all the turmoil on how MLSs share information, it could slow the app’s growth.

This article was updated on April 27, 2022.

What you should know

Courted is software that lets agents find other agents for multiple reasons, whether to refer work, recruit team members or even seek advice or mentorship. It’s an ideal tool for higher producing agents wanting to broadcast their expertise and empower their in-market professional network. It allows agents to search for colleagues according to performance in a specific category, such as luxury homes or a specific community, or by transaction characteristics, like who sells at the highest price most consistently. 

For lack of a better descriptor, Courted is a networking tool. But it’s smart use of market data, and deep analysis of 15 years of transactions across the country gives it a very unique take on who you should be working with to better ensure success. After all, a deal can only get done if both sides do what they’re supposed to do.

Among other valuable data, Courted found two outstanding metrics contributing to an agent’s long-term success: one, agents that have the highest average sales price in their local market, regardless of volume, and two, the overall success of agents within an agent’s sphere. This is why who is on the other side of your deal matters. Courted calls it, the “halo effect.”

Anecdotally, a close friend of mine is a top producing agent in La Jolla, CA. He’s told me that he’ll recommend his sellers work with the buyer whose agent has the best track record of closing smoothly and on-time, even when the offer is less.

After all, it’s about being an advisor and adding value to clients. More money doesn’t always equate to more value, which is especially the case when it comes to what agents spend on marketing. The depth of your advertising budget doesn’t mean you’re the best agent for what I have to sell. Courted lets me find who is the best agent for my listing in my market for a four-bedroom, three-bath trophy to mid-century modernism.  

And while local market stats are crucial for every-day deals, Courted can be leveraged for out-of-market referrals, too.

A lot of apps are trying to counter-sell the “disruption” trend. Even though few software companies have been able to successfully dislodge the agent from the deal (at least not at scale), every proptech wants to prop itself up by championing the agent.

Well, Courted is one of the few that’s doing more than offering lip service. It can send agent performance hot sheets to let users know who is closing deals where, at what price, how often and in what neighborhoods. 

The intent of the software is for agents to meet agents. It can be loosely described as an industry-focused LinkedIn. Or HomeLight for only agents.

Users create profiles that become populated with local MLS performance data. The more deals you’ve done, the more robust your Courted account will look. It pulls in everything, too: DOM record, average sale price, annual volume, neighborhoods in which you excel, years in the business, property types sold and buy- and sell-side history. It’s impressive.

In-app messaging facilitates connections, and a slick map search can visually sharpen search results all the way down to which agents perform the best on specific streets — a critical stat when you want to build a team to dominate a wealthy suburb or high-end urban neighborhood.

In places where high-rise dwellings are popular, as in Courted’s first city of Miami, the app can help users find out which agents sell the most units in a particular building or even that building’s most popular floor.

The software also does a bit of marketing on behalf of its users through a series of “awards” graphics that highlight market milestones and accomplishments. Agents can repurpose these badges in social environments and listing presentations, for example. They’re called Courted Achievements, and help other agents quickly determine if you’re worth a reach out. 

One of Courted’s sharpest, and most simple, social marketing benefits is the ability to in moments publish digestible market activity charts. They’re fed to users automatically as stand-alone graphics for an array of metrics. They can be texted, too. 

No, market data won’t win the content game, but they make great feed filler and can help educate pesky buyers or unreasonable sellers. 

The company is active in Miami, and it has data ready for Southern California, San Diego and Denver. It’s eyeing Washington, D.C. and the mid-Atlantic, too.

Courted reminds me of some of my favorite data-rich apps, like TopHap, Core Present (DashCMA) and the now defunct-but-ahead-of-its-time MyPlanIt. It deftly maneuvers agent performance information into any shape needed to inform those seeking it. It can be whatever you want it to be.

The software depicts an agent’s performance in simple, visual lists and charts, and transaction cards show deals done over time.

Open house invites can be carefully curated by searching for those agents active in a particular zip code or neighborhood, and recruiting tactics can be bettered by searching for years of experience, price points or total volume.

I’ve found that those developers who understand how to deftly wield data rarely run dry on more ways to do it. There’s a lot of potential here. Even I have ideas for this app. But there’s also sound intrinsic business acumen here. The industry doesn’t need another lead app or way for consumers to find homes. It needs more ways for the best agents to rise to the top, to work together for the greater good of the industry.

What the industry needs is a way to find itself, a digital mortar to bind agents to their markets and to their value in the transaction. The more often smart agents can find each other, the smarter their market becomes.

Courted isn’t unlike Side, the team-oriented boutique brokerage builder. It wants good agents to find each other, knowing that’s how the industry will best emerge from its current state of uncertain evolution.

What I see here is a better-looking multiple listing service, a more able-bodied machine pumping out cooler, more valuable products from the raw (data) material that agents go out and generate.

Its founder Sean Soderstrom told me during our demo that instead of building another app for property search, he wanted to build one that put agents at the center of search.

“An agent’s network in the community is an indicator of future success,” he said.

Have a technology product you would like to discuss? Email Craig Rowe

Craig C. Rowe started in commercial real estate at the dawn of the dot-com boom, helping an array of commercial real estate companies fortify their online presence and analyze internal software decisions. He now helps agents with technology decisions and marketing through reviewing software and tech for Inman.

Show Comments Hide Comments

Comments