From one introvert to another, how can you market yourself to your database without resorting to extroverted tactics like cold calling, door-knocking or popping-by? Try these simple strategies.

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Did you know? There are far more introverts in the world than we think. In fact, I was recently watching a 2012 TED talk that suggests that as much as half of our population is introverted.

You wouldn’t guess that at first glance, though. Especially in industries like real estate, where extroverted activities like cold calling, door-knocking and just “dropping by” reign supreme, you wouldn’t think an introverted person would thrive.

But being extroverted isn’t a prerequisite for being good at sales and marketing.

You can be just as successful in real estate if you’re introverted, and you can still be a world-class, high-touch agent without showing up on people’s doorsteps. It’s all about knowing how to market yourself in your own way.

There’s no right way to market yourself, and there’s nothing that says you have to stick to extroverted marketing tactics.

So from one introvert to another, how can you market yourself to your database — without resorting to extroverted tactics? Try the strategies below.

Play to your strengths

Contrary to popular belief, introverts don’t hate dealing with people, and we aren’t necessarily shy. The real hallmark of introverts is that stimulation — like big social gatherings — drains us of energy.

So when you’re planning marketing activities, the key is to rely on things that don’t drain you of your energy. For example, many introverted types naturally prefer written communication, which makes things like social media strategies, email marketing and blogs perfect choices.

These low-interaction channels are an excellent way to reach millennial and Gen-Z audiences, who are used to doing things online anyway — and whose purchasing decisions can be highly influenced by what they see online.

Others tend toward research and creative problem-solving, which opens up other avenues for customizing your messaging.

Do your homework — and target your messaging

When you get an email, are you more likely to open the one that directly addresses a need of yours or one that you can tell got blasted to someone’s entire database?

This is one of the biggest advantages that introverts have when it comes to marketing. We generally talk less and listen more — so we can pick out those direct needs and address them in a way that attracts clients and prospects to us.

It’ll take some research beforehand, but it will be well-worth the effort to research your clients and prospects and target your message to them.

It doesn’t have to come down to creeping them on social media; an additional field on your appointment form-fill to ask what their favorite Starbucks drink is or whether they’re a first-time homebuyer is just as effective.

In this case, it’s the little things that count. Showing up to a listing presentation with their favorite coffee in hand or offering them a book on how to manage personal finances around a big investment like a home sends a strong message — you listen, you know what they need, and you know how to help them solve a problem.

Another good way to use this information is to put little selfie videos in your emails that introduce yourself and talk a little bit about what you can help them with.

These don’t have to be fancy productions. A quick recording on your smartphone will do the trick. All you’re doing is putting a personal touch into your email without having a face-to-face conversation; you get to keep your energy and come across as a high-touch agent at the same time.

Go above and beyond with client appreciation

Just like targeting your messaging, effective client appreciation as an introvert is all about the gesture.

For example, hosting a larger community event like an outdoor movie night is a great way to show client appreciation without resorting to extroverted tactics. Sure, it’s a big social gathering, but people don’t have to directly interact with you to understand the message you’re sending.

You’re bringing people together in a community environment, where clients can share their experiences with prospects — and everyone gets to know you as a neighbor and friend.

Another good example I’ve heard in the past is making a bunch of restaurant reservations for special days like Valentine’s Day a few months in advance and offering them up to prospects and clients just in case they forgot to make their own.

It’s a little gesture, but the thoughtfulness and anticipation of need is what people will remember.

Don’t overdo it

An introvert’s energy is a precious resource, and it’s important to save it for what matters most.

Strategically planning when and how you’re going to use that energy, especially for things like emails and blog posts, has two big advantages: It keeps you from burning out, and it keeps your clients and prospects from experiencing reader fatigue.

Have some advice for marketing the heck out of your database as an introvert? Share it in the comments below.

Erin Green is an associate copywriter at Lone Wolf Technologies Company in Cambridge, Ontario. Follow her on Twitter and connect with her on LinkedIn.

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